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City University, London

UOA 25 - General Engineering and Mineral & Mining Engineering

RA5a: Research environment and esteem

RESEARCH ENVIRONMENT AND ESTEEM

                                                                                         

1. INTRODUCTION

This submission of all engineering research within the School of Engineering and Mathematical Sciences to UoA 25 reflects the restructuring in 2001 from three discrete departments (with three UoA entries) to a single unified School.  This transformation, instigated by the then new Dean (Professor Dinos Arcoumanis FREng) to promote stronger cooperation between researchers, has resulted in the creation of a distinctive research ethos fostering interdisciplinary research and made easier by the relatively small size of the School. Applied research in collaboration with industry has continued to flourish and new research areas have been established, such as automotive engineering, biomedical engineering and systems and business, which have been supported by strategic appointments and re-organisation of staff.  Since the restructuring, the School has been very successful in attracting new, research-active staff. Over 50% of academic staff have joined since the last RAE, research income has increased by 40%, the number of research students (FTEs) by 70%, research degrees awarded by 20%, and research studentships awarded by 300%. The present School has developed significantly from that submitted in the 2001 RAE; evidence of this is provided below. 

 

 

2.     RESEARCH ENVIRONMENT

 

2.1    Response to RAE 2001: Research Structure, Strategy, Vision and Future Plans 

 

Evaluation of research plans described in RAE2001 

Arising from the reorganization of the School and the focused recruitment of staff to support selected areas, the research plans in RAE2001 have been totally reworked and redeveloped.  This, and the decision to submit to UoA 25, renders any significant comments on the former plans irrelevant. The focus has been on the future direction of the School. Plans for development were created, taking advice from members of the discipline-based Industrial Advisory Committees and alignment of activities with public funding opportunities.  Key directions for the School are: 

 

     A clear emphasis on enhancing and promoting research quality

  A focus of resources on areas identified to be of distinction and strength

     An organizational restructuring designed to promote interdisciplinary and cross-disciplinary activities

 

The remodelled School has been able to achieve critical mass and excellence in selected areas, which has encouraged the development of interdisciplinary activities which build on major activities of strength. The plans have led to a focus on selected fields such as energy and the environment, instrumentation, construction processes, control, systems and biomedical engineering, underpinned by our desire to contribute to knowledge, benefit industry and society, and improve the quality of life and protect the environment. The School actively promotes knowledge transfer of its applications focused research. 

 

 

Research Structure 

The multidisciplinary approach to research is based around an integration of applied research, research in generic technologies and fundamental research. The key areas of applied research are energy, environment, transportation, construction, management and biomedical processes.  These are supported by research into the generic technologies of optical instrumentation, sensors and communications.  Fundamental research in systems, control, and computational fluid dynamics underpins these activities. This research is centred on four administrative units of strength and distinction – the Research Clusters – which provide the focus for this submission in the areas of:

 

                                Advanced Industrial Applications for Transportation (AIAT)

                                Construction Processes (CP)

                                Instrumentation and Sensors (I&S)

                                Systems and Control (S&C)

 

(together with the area of Applied Mathematics submitted to UoA 21).  The Clusters, led by senior and experienced academics and with an average of 9 Category A staff per cluster, facilitate research by providing a forum for the organization of all research activities, the mentoring and support of staff and students, management and allocation of central research funds and the promotion of a more flexible culture that responds quickly and efficiently to initiatives in research.  Characteristic examples of success in focusing on clusters are that staff from the CP and I&S clusters have won substantial grants from EPSRC and the EU to develop and implement optically-based ‘smart structures’ for better monitoring of bridges, and the award of an EPSRC Platform Grant to support work in optical and laser based instrumentation across the AIAT and I&S Clusters. The expansion of the scope in S&C from control to systems engineering and management has enabled the winning of three major EU grants on control and monitoring of chemical process operations and motivated research on the fundamentals of systems integration.  New activity in biomedical engineering has been developed where I&S, S&C, and AIAT have cooperated on new initiatives (coronary flow simulation), with distinctive expertise in the areas of instrumentation, machine vision, CFD, systems and control. A common underlying factor has been the partnership with industry, linked to the strategic plans of the University to promote research which informs policy and professional practice, in exploiting the challenges in new fields of applications and in developing fundamental research in selected areas of real value to the economy and society. 

 

Current and emerging collaborations between Research Clusters are represented in the diagram below: 

 

 

 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Research Strategy 

The research strategy of the University is led by the Pro-Vice-Chancellor for Research (Professor Arcoumanis) who is responsible for implementation of the University’s five-year Strategic Plan and chairs the University’s Research Committee. This arrangement is mirrored at School level in the School Research Committee, chaired by the Associate Dean for Research. The research strategy of the School is to develop internationally recognized and sustainable research in selected and distinctive areas of strength in engineering, reflecting both expertise and promise. This is achieved by focusing on areas that are relevant to practice in the industries with which we work, are supported by the existing infrastructure and are distinctive relative to activities in other London institutions. The School strategy reflects the University’s five year strategic plans by prioritising support for applied research and fundamental research with potential for applications. Evidence includes (i) the well-established links with automotive companies worldwide for research in advanced reciprocating engines and industrial screw compressors in the Energy and the Environment area, (ii) links with the aerospace industry in the flow control area, (iii) support for business in the systems and decision making areas, and (iv) development of optical techniques and sensors and application to a range of industries including construction processes. 

 

Sustainability is central to research strategy and involves: strategic replacement of departing staff, balanced research in applications and fundamentals, and identification of synergies between clusters, addressing challenging interdisciplinary problems, and maintaining and improving support services and infrastructure. The main drivers of the research strategy are: (i) creating a small number of areas of significant potential and impact; (ii) developing and sustaining collaborative links with industry; (iii) undertaking industrially relevant, interdisciplinary research; (iv) developing the fundamentals required for new technologies and challenging applications; and (v) contributing to knowledge through a balanced portfolio of experimental and basic research. The strategy involves development of the particular strengths of the Clusters together with a consolidation of the synergies between them, aiming for excellence in interdisciplinary areas identified as energy, environment, biomedical and engineering of complex systems. Illustrative features of the School’s activities (discussed in Section 2.2) are:

 

● Improving the efficiency and reducing the environmental impact of advanced sea, land and air transportation systems (AIAT).

● Enhancing construction processes within the urban environment and subject to environmental forces (CP).

● Leading the development of advanced optical, optical fibre, photonics systems, sensors and transducers for industrial applications (I&S).

● Developing decision-oriented approaches to manage and control complex systems, integrate their design, technological risk, and reliability through process life-cycle (S&C).

● Integrating and strengthening the biomedical activity by exploiting expertise in instrumentation, radiography, fluid dynamics, systems, modelling and control.

 

 

2.2 Research Clusters and Activities

 

 Advanced Industrial Applications for Transportation (AIAT)

 

The AIAT Cluster was established after the last RAE to integrate research in advanced optical diagnostics and computational methods as applied to automotive and aeronautical engineering systems. The Cluster’s formation was triggered by the relocation in 2001 of Prof. Arcoumanis’ group from Imperial College to City University supported by a £1M grant from City to update its thermodynamic laboratories and establishing the Centre for Energy and the Environment. Further strategic support has been provided by a £1.5M grant from HEFCE as part of the strategic alliance with QMUL and, more recently, by a £0.5M EPSRC Platform Grant awarded jointly to the Instrumentation and Transportation clusters. The AIAT Cluster enjoys strong and lasting links with major international companies in the areas of transportation due to the reputation of its senior staff and its well-equipped laboratories. The Cluster encompasses the Centre for Energy and the Environment with long-standing work in reciprocating engines and positive displacement compressors and the Centre for Aeronautics which, together with QMUL, are the oldest laboratories in the country (1909).   

 

Membership: Over 60% of Cluster staff (in bold italics) joined City since 2001. Professor C. Arcoumanis (Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Director of the Cluster); Professor R. Banerjee (Professor of Dynamics);  Professor N. Stosic (Professor of Mechanical Engineering); Dr. M. Gavaises (Reader in CFD); Dr D. Greenwell (Reader in Flight Dynamics); Dr A. Kovacevic (Senior Lecturer in Design); Dr C. Cheung (Senior Lecturer in Aeroelasticity); Dr R. Lockett (Senior Lecturer in Combustion); Dr J.M. Nouri (Senior Lecturer in Fluid Mechanics); Dr S. Prince (Lecturer in Aerodynamics) and Dr M. Tomas-Rodriguez (Lecturer in Aeronautics). Two new members are joining City in January 2008: Dr.C. Atkin (Professor of Aeronautical Engineering) from Qinetiq and Dr K. Pullen (Reader in Energy Systems) from Imperial College London.

 

Expertise

The Centre for Energy and the Environment pursues fundamental and applied computational and experimental research on automotive and marine engines, fuel injection systems, piston-ring lubrication, positive displacement compressors and, more recently, fuel cells. Its strength lies in the sponsored collaborative research and consultancy performed for most of the major global automotive and compressor corporations. Of particular importance is the internationally leading research into cavitation in fuel injection systems and lubricant films and the design of twin-screw compressors which has attracted major funding from global corporations and major awards from professional institutions in the UK and abroad. The two groups maintain their competitive edge in supporting industry in the design and manufacturing of fuel-efficient engines and positive displacement compressors, through the development of very advanced computer models validated by sophisticated experiments using laser-based techniques. The Centre for Aeronautics encompasses both aeronautics and air transport research, with expertise in aerodynamic compressible flows, computational fluid dynamics, flight dynamics, aircraft structures and aeroelasticity, composite and smart structures and, above all, aerodynamic flow control. Areas of research excellence include fluid-structure interaction between aerodynamic flow fields and aircraft-wing aeroelastic deformations and viscous vortical flow control on fixed and rotary wing aircraft.

 

Vision, Objectives, Strategy    

The vision and strategy of the Cluster are to extend its existing expertise into emerging new generations of reciprocating engines, high-efficiency screw compressors, PEM fuel cells, and hybrid/electric vehicles in order to provide industry with evolutionary designs leading to outstanding efficiency and much reduced exhaust emissions and noise. The objective is to continue the development of laser diagnostics and in-house computational fluid dynamics towards more accurate, easy to use systems with higher temporal and spatial resolution that will allow application to new engine and compressor designs, but also place increasing focus on hybrid and electric systems for emerging low carbon vehicles. In aeronautics, the aim under the leadership of Prof. Atkin will be to continue research into flow control devices to improve system performance (laminar flow control for drag reduction and turbulent separation control) and the exploitation of such techniques by industry to help meet the ACARE 2020 targets for aerospace. Research will focus on gaining fundamental understanding of such mechanisms through experimentation, numerical simulation and use of lower-order methods to investigate integration on real vehicles. Synergies with I&S and S&C will enhance the capabilities.

 

Research Achievements and Outputs 

Although there is unquestionable experience within the Cluster in the development and application of laser-based techniques and computational fluid dynamics to industrial problems, the expertise that makes this group internationally renowned is in fluid mechanics and combustion of reciprocating engines, including fuel injection systems, the design and optimisation of screw compressors and air flow control in propulsion systems. In particular, the identification of nozzle cavitation and its modelling in fuel injection systems for automotive and marine engines has been internationally-leading for the last 10 years and has been recently extended to piston-ring lubrication, allowing for the all-important link between wear and cavitation in reciprocating machinery to be resolved. In the area of aeronautics, the expertise is in aerodynamics of leading-edge vortex flows, flow control for stall suppression on aircraft wings and dynamic stall suppression on helicopter blades. Achievements have been directly employed by industry (more than 20 industrial partners worldwide) in the form of improved designs of fuel injection systems for better mixing and combustion in automotive and marine engines and improved design of screw compressors leading to higher efficiencies in a range of industrial applications. The most important outputs have been documented in the form of archival publications in respected international journals, patents and undocumented technical innovations achieved through evolutionary funded research with global organisations selecting City University’s AIAT researchers as their preferred academic partners out of many worldwide.  

 

AIAT RESEARCH OUTPUTS 

 
 

Year

Research Stud.  FTEs

Research Degrees

Research Funding (£k)

Journal Papers

Conference Papers

Books, Chapters, Encyclop. Articles

Governm.      Reports

Patents

Industrial Reports

 

PhD

MPh

 

2001

10.00

1

 

313

13

23

 

 

 

 

 

2002

11.50

5

 

694

12

17

2

 

 

 

 

2003

14.00

3

 

796

18

20

 

 

 

 

 

2004

17.50

2

 

661

10

28

6

 

 

 

 

2005

17.16

2

1

551

15

28

2

 

 

 

 

2006

16.00

1

1

756

28

27

4

 

 

 

 

2007

16.00

7

 

531

20

16

2

 

 

 

 

TOTAL

 

21

2

4,301

120

159

16

 

5

21

 

 

Construction Processes (CP)

 

The Construction Processes Research Cluster was formed from the Engineering Structures and the Geotechnical Engineering Research Centres.  At the start of the current RAE period these two centres were established as the focus for research in civil engineering and computational fluid dynamics related to offshore engineering applications. Two staff have left the university (Professors Younis and Chamberlain) and four research active staff have joined the Cluster leading to some changes to the research plans of 2001. Research in computational fluid dynamics has been replaced by computational research into the interaction between floating structures and large waves using finite elements, led by Ma. In structural engineering, a new area in developing methodologies for assessing structural reliability has been established by Dymiotis-Wellington; research into the repair of structures using robotics was discontinued (staff retirement). Recruitment in geotechnical engineering has strengthened work on geotechnical centrifuge modelling, with an emphasis on applied research for industry (McNamara) and soil structure interaction (Goodey).

 

Membership: The Cluster staff members are (those joining since 2001 are in bold italics):  Professor R.N. Taylor (Professor of Geotechnical Engineering, Director of the Cluster), Professor J.H. Atkinson (Professor of Soil Mechanics), Professor L.F. Boswell (Professor of Structural Engineering), Professor K S Virdi (Professor of Structural Engineering), Dr Q.W. Ma (Reader in Computational Hydrodynamics), Dr A.M. McNamara (Senior Lecturer), Dr S.E. Stallebrass (Senior Lecturer), Dr C. Dymiotis-Wellington (Lecturer) and Dr R.J. Goodey (Lecturer).   

 

Expertise

The Cluster combines research in geotechnical engineering, hydrodynamics and structural engineering. In geotechnical engineering, Taylor and McNamara have addressed industry problems of construction processes, mainly concerning piled foundations and excavations in urban areas. Carefully designed centrifuge model tests using purpose-built actuators and instrumentation have provided insight into the mechanisms governing the behaviour of these structures which coupled with numerical analysis (Stallebrass) leads to greater certainty in design and better use of resources. Atkinson and Stallebrass have also examined how natural soil structure can influence soil-structure interaction problems. The involvement of industry in these projects is paramount, exemplified by the 15 industrial partners in two major EPSRC grants held by the group. In structural engineering, major grants have been awarded for work on structural integrity monitoring led by Boswell (collaborating with the I&S Cluster) and the effect of fire on structural members led by Virdi. These established research fields complement the emerging area of structural reliability. Research in computational hydrodynamics led by Ma is more established and has attracted significant funding as well as a small group of research students. A new efficient finite element method has been devised to model fully non-linear wave-structure interactions just before failure occurs. Further work on a mesh-less method capable of modelling breaking waves is in progress with promising results.

 

Vision, Objectives, Strategy

The Construction Processes Cluster will continue to undertake high quality research on the challenges faced by the construction industry. This research will focus on both construction within the urban environment and construction affected by environmental forces, such as offshore and near-shore structures. These areas will be developed to complement the search for sustainable construction solutions. With our London focus we are uniquely placed to participate in the many civil engineering projects planned for London in the next five years. 

 

Facilities for high quality physical model testing will remain a key feature of research in geotechnical engineering and structural engineering, which will be developed in collaboration with other Clusters, particularly in instrumentation and monitoring (I&S). Physical modelling will be complemented by innovative numerical modelling, particularly in hydrodynamics and structure dynamics (S&C). Industry-focused research in geotechnical engineering will exploit new expertise in structural reliability, re-enforced by synergies with S&C and broadening its application to a wide range of civil engineering structures. 

 


Research Achievements and Outputs

Major achievements of the Cluster during the period are:

  ● Insight into construction processes in geotechnical engineering provided by substantial series of centrifuge model tests, for example those carried out as part of two major EPSRC grants, and the dissemination to industry of new design guidance resulting from this research.

 ● Successful development of smart innovative techniques (with I&S), such as optical fibre technology, to measure structural, or material performance.

 ● A new and highly efficient method called Quasi ALE Finite Element Method (QALE-FEM) for nonlinear wave-structure interactions before wave breaking occurs enabling efficient modelling of the difficult problem of nonlinear interaction between floating structures and large water waves.

 ● Research in partnership with the construction industry has progressed through charitable research funds in both geotechnical and structural engineering, currently supporting four research students.

 ● Commercial development of a novel sustainable and reusable pile, City SuRe pile™, (patent pending).

 ● Specialist symposia run by the Cluster have maintained and established good links to offshore and geotechnical construction industry through continuation of Jack-Up conferences (2001/2003/2005/2007) and the introduction of Construction Process in Geotechnical Engineering Symposia (2003/2005/2007).

 

 

CONSTRUCTION PROCESSES RESEARCH OUTPUTS                                                                                  

 
 

Year

Research Stud. FTEs

Research Degrees

Research Funding (£k)

Journal Papers

Conference Papers

Books, Chapters, Encyclop. Articles

Governm. Reports

Patents

Industrial Reports

 

PhD

MPh

 

2001

3.50

4

 

128

6

15

2

 

 

 

 

2002

3.50

 

1

85

3

 19

 

 

 

 

 

2003

4.00

3

1

104

4

 11

 

 

 

 

 

2004

2.67

1

 

203

7

5

2

 

 

 

 

2005

6.50

2

1

177

9

7

1

 

 

 

 

2006

9.00

 

1

310

5

11

1

 

 

 

 

2007

9.50

1

 

223

5

10

1

 

 

 

 

TOTAL

 

11

4

1,231

40

78

7

 

1

 

 

 

 Instrumentation and Sensors (I&S)

 

The Cluster draws together expertise in measurement & instrumentation, optical systems & photonics and biomedical instrumentation & measurement, building on established experimental and theoretical research in Measurement and Instrumentation from the early 1970s, most recently encompassing biomedical applications and radiography and nuclear science. The Cluster focuses on 3 key areas: instrumentation and sensors – both experimental and advanced modelling research in fibre optics, integrated optics and photonics systems, applied to several major industrial areas including biomedical engineering. The Cluster attracts support to promote engagement with industry in both basic and applied research and in advanced systems design, aiming for excellence in meeting current sensing challenges from industry and clinical practice, through novel development and applications in instrumentation.  

 

Membership: The Cluster comprises the following staff (those joining since 2001 are in bold italics): Professor K.T.V. Grattan (Professor of Measurement & Instrumentation, Director of the Cluster); Professor B.M.A. Rahman (Professor of Photonics); Professor S.H. Khan (Professor of Instrumentation and Sensors); Professor M.J. Farquharson, (Professor of Radiological Physics); Dr P. Kyriacou (Reader in Biomedical Engineering); Dr T. Sun, (Reader in Photonics); Dr R. Price (Reader in Radiography); Dr M. Rajarajan (Senior Lecturer in Photonics and Communication). Dr W. Lyons (Lecturer in Instrumentation) joins in January 2008. The Cluster has been strengthened with 5 appointments since 2001 and broadened its scope in the industrial and biomedical sectors.  

 

Vision, Objectives, Strategy

The vision is expansion of international excellence and relevance to stakeholders, bringing expertise to bear on niche industrial and clinical problems. Emerging applications demand innovative solutions in new yet critical areas; for example novel compact chemical and biophotonic integrated optic sensors, using gratings and surface plasmon techniques and fibre laser diagnostics in pioneering structural monitoring, automotive and fire detection systems and antigen monitoring.  Non-ionizing THz waves and ionizing radiation interactions with biological tissue will promote excellence in the design, development and evaluation of new medical technologies through a synergy of instrumentation, optics, systems biology, machine vision, bio-signal/image processing and diagnostic imaging.  Strategically, experimental work will be underpinned by developing advanced system designs and modelling, such as in nanophotonics, photonic crystals, microstructured fibres and polarization controllers. Sensor systems and networks design represents a new synergy with S&C. 

 

Expertise, Achievements and Outputs

The focused research themes of the Cluster can be summarized under three major headings, encompassing experimental and modelling activity: 

 

Fibre Optic Sensor Technology: The Cluster is distinctive internationally for the development and application of fibre optic sensor systems for niche industrial sectors, including pioneering work creating optically-based structural monitoring techniques for bridges, concrete structures and stonework, patented work on food quality control and automotive emission monitoring through to distributed fire detection, all identified industrial needs. The work is supported by EPSRC, EU and industry leading to ‘proof of concept’ techniques to provide both physical and chemical diagnostic data and ‘take-up’ by industry.  Continuing research exploits various fibre Long Period and Bragg grating-based systems and fibre laser-based sensors for physical and chemical monitoring, through the design and fabrication of specialist fibre-based sensors including designing measurand-sensitive coated specialist fibres for either point or distributed monitoring. 

 

Biomedical Instrumentation: Research focuses on two key themes: novel instrumentation for healthcare monitoring and better understanding of physiological processes, creating systems with clinicians for the prognosis, diagnosis and treatment of disease or the rehabilitation of patients through new medical ‘tools’ which extend the frontiers of current optical and electronic technologies. The work includes the interaction of light with biological tissues to study pathophysiological processes and the development of novel non-invasive medical instrumentation, for example for the non-invasive transcutaneous estimation of complex blood components, glucose, bilirubin and oxyhaemoglobin. Research on X-ray interaction parameters measuring structure and composition of cancer tissue to aid clinicians in understanding physiological processes includes developing classification techniques for determining the margins in cancer surgery and histology. Nuclear radiation sensor systems are under development for radiotherapy, biology, space and the nuclear sectors, leading to improved measurement certainty, specificity and device sensitivity. 

 

Advanced Modelling: There are three major themes: optics & photonics; biomedical simulation & diagnostics and the design of industrial and clinical instrument systems, with work underpinned by experimental testing and validation. In optics and photonics, the pioneering development and use of fully-vectorial and computationally efficient finite element-based modal solutions and time domain approaches support the design, characterization and optimization of a wide range of photonic devices, incorporating other physical models and addressing a range of waveguides and guided-wave devices.  Research in Terahertz propagation underpins the design of advanced security systems.  Mathematical modelling and CFD studies of physiological and anatomical functions enhance the understanding of various physiological phenomena and are used for new instrumentation and diagnostics. Monte Carlo simulation of radiation effects are applied through deterministic modelling for QA and radiotherapy treatments. Research is underway in advanced mathematical modelling and CAD using finite element techniques for the design and analysis of multilayer printed circuit boards, long-lifetime EM actuators and the solution of the forward problem in magnetic field tomography (MFT) based on MEG to support industrial design. 

 


A summary of research outputs is given below:

 

 

INSTRUMENTATION & SENSORS RESEARCH OUTPUTS                                                                                

 
 

Year

Research Stud.   FTE

Research Degrees

Research Funding (£k)

Journal Papers

Conference Papers

Books, Chapters, Encyclop. Articles

Government Reports

Patents

Industrial Reports

 

PhD

MPh

 

2001

12.50

2

 

228

14

32

1

 

 

 

 

2002

14.00

2

 

608

18

29

1

 

 

 

 

2003

13.75

2

1

533

24

35

1

 

 

 

 

2004

17.71

5

 

572

27

35

2

 

 

 

 

2005

21.50

3

 

491

16

 25

 

 

 

 

 

2006

23.45

5

 

805

25

 35

 

 

 

 

 

2007

22.38

4

 

699

9

10

1

 

 

 

 

TOTAL

 

23

1

3,996

133

201

6

 

12

 

 

 

 

Systems and Control (S&C)                                                                                                                                               

 

The Systems and Control Cluster was created in 2001 by drawing together staff from Control, Systems, Statistics, and Management. It builds upon a well-established research base in the Control and Systems field, dating from the late 1970s (Hierarchical Control (Roberts), Multivariable Control and Systems Theory (Karcanias)), which from 2000 and beyond was re-enforced in Power Systems (Lai), Robust Control (Halikias) and Discrete Systems (Milonidis). The Control activities were expanded in the Systems area with activities in Statistical Modelling, Reliability and Maintenance (Newby joining from Statistics), Risk (Thomas from the Management group), Systems Engineering (Stupples, joining from PA consultancy (Royal Academy of Engineering Chair)). New appointments have further enhanced our systems basis by expertise in Machine Vision and Intelligent Systems (Liatsis) and Communication Networks (Rakocevic). The S&C activities extend the engineering approach to: Operations and Management of Industrial Processes, Energy and Environmental, Risk, Reliability, Security and Medical Applications. 

 

Membership (65% new or joined from other groups since 2001, in bold italics): Prof N. Karcanias, Professor of Control Theory and Design (Director of Cluster); Prof M.J. Newby, (Professor of Statistical Science, Risk Reliability and Maintenance); Prof P.J. Thomas (Professor of Engineering Development); Prof D.W. Stupples (Royal Academy of Engineering, Professor in Systems Integration); Prof L.L. Lai (Professor of Power Systems); Dr G. Halikias (Senior Lecturer in Control); Dr P. Liatsis (Reader in Sensing Systems); Dr V. Rakocevic (Senior Lecturer in Networks and Communications); Dr E. Milonidis (Lecturer in Control); Prof A.G. Hessami (Systems & Security, Category C, ATKINS).

 

Expertise, Vision, Objectives, Strategy 

The Cluster has expertise in Systems, Control Theory, Design Methodologies, Mathematical Methods and Statistics, Computations, Decision Theory, Reliability, Machine Vision and Networks. There is basic and applied research with an emphasis on Design, Decision and Control, and Computations of Complex Systems. The Design for Management of Complexity is viewed as the great challenge to technological progress, aspiring to develop the fundamentals of the Systems and Control that will make the Cluster a significant contributor in understanding and managing Technological Complexity. The aim is to develop concepts, methodologies and tools suitable for complex systems emerging in challenging new applications. The complexity of such problems necessitates holistic and innovative solutions founded on the multi-disciplinary systems approach and supported by development of the fundamentals. Applications are in Integrated Design, Diagnostics, Control of Engineering/Business Processes, Networks, Biomedical problems, Energy, Environment, Risk, Safety and Security. S&C envisages focused joint activities on: Sensor systems and networks design with I&S, structural reliability and structural dynamics with CP, actuator distribution and energy management with AIAT.

 

Research and Outputs 

The Cluster activities are grouped into two interlinked themes: 

 

   ● Control Theory and Design Methodologies: Major research and publications in control have been in: Control in Integrated Systems Design, Algebraic Computations, Robust Control and Control of Power Systems. The group has produced many outputs and made contributions to both fundamentals and applications. InIntegrated Systems Design a structural framework has been introduced for extending control to process synthesis and overall instrumentation from early to late design stages; this introduces a new systems paradigm, the Control of Structure Evolving Systems (plenary paper of Karcanias to IFAC Symposium SSSC07). The field of Approximate Algebraic Computations (Karcanias) was introduced for models with uncertainty and concepts/algorithms, bridging the gap between symbolic and numerical computations, were developed. In Robust Stabilization (Halikias), significant contributions were made in super-optimization theory (methods for breaching the duality gap) with applications to Structured-Singular-Values in Robust Control and Quadratic Integer Programming. In the Control of Power Systems (Lai), contributions were made in the application of Intelligent Techniques and Distributed Generation of Power Systems (Lai was awarded FIEEE for his contribution). In Intelligent Systems (Liatsis), the emphasis has been on new applications in machine vision by research in the stereo correspondence problem, 3D surface reconstruction and development of sensing algorithms for automotive and biomedical applications and in Networks on security and management of next-generation mobile communication networks (Rakocevic). Information Systems security emerges as a synergy with I&S Cluster (EPSRC network).

 

   ● Engineering Systems: Performance, Diagnostics and Design: This theme addresses complexity using systems concepts and an Engineering Systems Approach to non-traditional engineering applications, exploiting strengths in the fundamentals and the experience of industrial collaborators. Significant contributions were made in Decision Modelling for Wear and Degradation Models(Newby), with applications to Design for reliability (Rolls-Royce Aero-engines project, Ultra-Reliable aircraft etc). Linked to this has been the development of Probabilistic Approaches to Risk and Reliability (Newby) to characterize the failure behaviour of systems and devices (EPSRC Interdisciplinary Research In Dependability), designing inspection regimes, risk analysis for aero-engine replacement policies etc. The Risk Research addresses the interface between technology, economics and health and aids decision making on economically strategic issues. Examples include the analysis of BSE/vCJD (Thomas, Newby) and Chernobyl childhood thyroid cancers. The economic sustainability study of nuclear power (EPSRC "SPRIng" project) and the systems safety is a new initiative. Research on the Methodologies for Complex Systems has been based on projects linked to applications and involves issues such as: (i) The migration of Control Methodologies to Management and Re-engineering of Business, Supply Chains of Chemical Processes (the subject of three major EU grants (Karcanias) and (ii) the application of operational research, financial mathematics and systems analysis to large-scale systems design for energy, waste management (BIFFA), military (MoD) and intelligence systems (GCHQ) (Stupples).  

 


 

SYSTEMS & CONTROL RESEARCH OUTPUTS                                                                                   

 
 

Year

Research Stud. FTEs

Research Degrees

Research Funding (£k)

Journal Papers

Conference Papers

Books, Chapters, Encyclop. Articles

Governm. Reports

Patents

Industrial Reports

 

PhD

MPh

 

2001

16.30

2

 

48

4

25

3

 

 

 

 

2002

11.84

2

 

307

11

20

3

 

 

 

 

2003

14.00

4

 

249

16

28

1

 

 

 

 

2004

18.50

7

2

244

16

15

2

 

 

 

 

2005

21.50

3

1

178

9

34

 

 

 

 

 

2006

21.00

 

1

200

35

38

7

 

 

 

 

2007

22.50

5

 

207

23

23

5

 

 

 

 

TOTAL

 

23

4

1,434

114

183

21

10

1

16

 

 

 

2.3 Interdisciplinary Activities, Links and Partnerships 

 

As discussed above, the research within the four Clusters of the School is actively interdisciplinary, international in its focus and secures funds for broadly-based projects.  Examples include:  

 

● EPSRC and EU grants won for work on smart structures (bridges and foundations) (CP and I&S)

● EPSRC Platform Grant for advanced Instrumentation (AIAT and I&S)

● ESRC Sustainable Technologies Programme grant for alternative energy sources evaluation (Engineering & Cass Business School) 

● EPSRC DIRC project: Dependability of Computer Based Systems (S&C with Informatics, five UK Universities and sponsoring companies)

● Three EU projects supporting migration of S&C expertise to: Business performance of process industries (VTT Finland, SIMSERV-ADMAN network of industries); Evaluation – Redesign of chemical supply chains in response to REACH legislation (linking with Chemistry at York, Gant and SMEs network)

● EU Charity supports research on atheromatic plaque rapture of coronary arteries (S&C, AIAT, I&S and hospitals)

● Strategic international partnerships: UKIERI (British Council), EPSRC and EU (e.g. IST, Growth, Marie Curie) creating critical mass (I&S and S&C) 

 

 

2.4 Support for Research 

 

Support for research promoted by the School Research Committee includes: 

 

University and School Support:  In addition to grant income won, research innovation has benefited since 2001 by six two-year University Fellowships, and five University Studentships, an extra investment of £300k in fee-waiving, and a number of Pump-Priming grants allocated to young researchers. Research Development Funds supplemented by additional School funds (in excess of £350k) have been invested in four University Fellowships for early career researchers since 2004. Research is promoted through a University research day involving competition with a £60k prize across the university and half-day events focusing on interdisciplinary areas.

 

Research Student Training: Students are assigned to a lead and second supervisor within a Cluster. The University centrally provides broad training on Research Methods and Communication/Presentation skills. Students attend selected postgraduate courses that they are offered (at City or elsewhere) and participate in theme-oriented study groups; they are strongly encouraged to present their work at internal seminars and at international Conferences, drawing on support from research grants, charities or Cluster funds.

 

 

 2.5 Enhancement of the Research Infrastructure during the Period 

 

Areas which have benefited from major strategic infrastructure investment are:

 

● AIAT: £1M from the University and £1.5M HEFCE grant (Strategic Alliance in Engineering with QMUL) for establishment of the Centre for Energy and the Environment  

● CP:  £75k has been invested for upgrading the Geotechnical Centrifuge facilities

● I&S:  Wellcome Foundation: fund infrastructure renewal in optics (with Optometry Department) 

● I&S: Establish Biomedical laboratories through £150k University support 

● I&S: A major donation of £3.9M has been confirmed to create the new SAAD Centre for diagnostic x-ray and medical and ultrasound imaging, and MRI laboratory offering new and  ‘state-of-the-art’ facilities

 

The newly created SAAD Centre offers unequalled research opportunities in diagnostic x-ray and ultra sound imaging, with MRI facilities being funded in 2008, designed to encourage new research activities and synergies between Clusters. This will allow activities ranging from applied medical imaging, through archeological studies, to flow imaging in porous media such as rocks for geological applications to be developed.

 

 

2.6 Research and the Users

 

The School fosters active engagement with industry; strategic partnerships include:

● AIAT: global automotive companies on fuel injection systems performance (Toyota, Yamaha, BMW, Nissan, Siemens, Caterpillar), piston-ring lubrication (BP/Castrol) and Proton Exchange membrane Fuel Cells (Toyota).

● I&S: industry and clinical practice addressing specific needs for novel instrumentation in fire detection (Kidde, Corus), food quality monitoring (Sortex), structural monitoring (Mouchel +EU-partners) and in healthcare technology for non-invasive diagnosis of diseases with London Hospitals. 

● CP: piled foundations (Stent Foundations), earthquake resistant buildings (Pell-Frischmann), reinforced concrete mooring dolphins subject to ship impact (Global Maritime). 

● S&C: SIMSERV-ADMAN EU industrial associations, working with chemical SMEs on REACH evaluation, Rolls-Royce Aero engines on Design for Reliability, BNFL/MoD on safety of nuclear technology etc.  

● Government Advisory Bodies: S&C Cluster members participate in: Defence Scientific Advisory Committee, MOD Defence Procurement Agency, Integration Authority, GCHQ Technical Advisory Body and Academic Board of the Royal Navy's Department of Nuclear Science and I&S members chair DIUS National Measurement System working groups.

● Conferences/Symposia at City: on Laser and Optical Diagnostics, Compressors, Construction Processes in Geotechnical Engineering. Annual series of Public Research Lectures with London Livery Companies: exemplifies the outreach mission of the School.

● Spin-off companies in the healthcare and instrumentation fields have been developed by School staff.

 

 

2.7 Staffing Policy 

 

Existing Staff

New staff join a Research Cluster and have reduced teaching and administrative load in the first year. Financial support is available through Pump-Priming research activities (Conferences, research student support) and mentoring by a senior staff member helps develop supervision skills and successful grant proposals. Research management courses are organised by the University.   

 

Ensuring staff sustainability and retention is central to the School policy: the appraisal system assists career planning for staff members through their Individual Development Plan, the mentoring scheme and advice on promotion. 

 

Departing Staff and Appointments

The major restructuring exercise has resulted in a number of staff changes: implementing strategic replacements to strengthen areas of distinction within Clusters, as summarized below:

 

Table: Staff Movement & Sustainability

 

Staff Left

Reason

Area

Staff Appointed

Area

AIAT

 

Professor D. Peake

Retired

Aeronautics

Professor T. Kokkalis 

(Qinetiq) (01-07-02)

Aeronautics

Professor B. Mintz

Retired

Mechanical

Dr K. Pullen

(Reader, IC)  (01-01-08)

Mechanical

Professor  I. Smith                   

Retired

Mechanical
Dr A. Kovacevic 
(SL, internal)
Mechanical

Professor

T. Kokkalis (05-09-04)

Industry

Aeronautics

Dr D. Greenwell                  

(Reader, Bristol Univ)

Aeronautics

 

 

 

Dr. S. Prince (Qinetic)

Early-career

Aeronautics

 

 

 

Dr M. Tomas-Rodriguez 

(IC) Early-career

Aeronautics

/Control

 

 

 

Professor C. Atkin (Qinetiq) (01-01-08)

Aeronautics

CP

 

Professor   

D. Chamberain            

‘Spin-off’ consultancy

Structures

Dr. C. Dymiotis-Wellington

(Internal) Early-career

Structures

Professor B. Younis

Univ of California, Davis

Hydraulics

Dr. Q. Ma 

(Reader, UCL)

Hydrodynamics

 

 

 

Dr A. MacNamara 

(SL, Internal) Early-career

Geotechnics

 

 

 

Dr R. Goodey 

(Internal) Early-career

Geotechnics

I&S

 

Dr. M. Rizk

Retired

 

Biomedical

Dr P. Kyriacou

(Reader, QMUL)

Biomedical

 

 

 

Dr T. Sun

(Reader, Internal)

Photonics

 

 

 

Dr R. Price

(Reader, Liverpool)

Radiography

 

 

 

Dr M. Rajarajan 

(SL, Logica)

Photonics/

Communications

                                           

 

 

Dr W. Lyons 

(Lecturer, Limerick,

 01-01-08)

Instrumentation


 

S&C

 

Professor 

P.D. Roberts                     

     Retired     

Control

Dr E. Milonidis 

(Greece)

Control

Dr T Ellis                   

 Joined Kingston Univ    

Machine Vision

Dr P. Liatsis 

(Reader, UMIST)

Machine Vision

 

 

 

Dr V. Rakocevic 

(QMUL)             

Communications

 

 

 

Professor M.J. Newby 

(City Mathematics)

Statistics/Reliability

 

 

 

Professor P. Thomas

(City, Management)

Risk/Management

                                           

 

 

Professor D.W. Stupples    

(PA Cons, Royal Academy Engineering Chair)

Systems Engineering

 

 

3. ESTEEM INDICATORS 

  

Since 2001, we have restructured and invested in both human resources and infrastructure to define and consolidate the research strengths of City’s engineering activities. Some 60% of new academic staff have been strategically appointed to strengthen existing and emerging areas. Funding for research has nearly doubled with the majority coming from long-standing partnerships with global industries with corresponding increases in research students and staff and a better balance between EU and Research Council funds. 

 

3.1 Research Income and Partnerships per Cluster 

 

AIAT 

Within the AIAT Cluster, the engines group has maintained through the last RAE period its long-standing partnerships with the major global automotive industries, demonstrated by more than £2.5M funding from Toyota, Yamaha, BMW, Siemens, Delphi and Caterpillar. The engines group has also extended the range of its traditional and internationally renowned research activities (Cavitation, CFD) into new power sources such as fuel cells. It is increasing its interaction with the marine industry through research in fuel injection systems and propellers, winning £0.3M of funding from companies such as Toyota Europe and B&W. The long established and internationally leading academic group in screw compressors (many awards) has maintained its links with UK and overseas (India, Russia and China) companies with £0.5M of direct funding. The Aeronautics group has consolidated its expertise in aerodynamic flow control for stall suppression with more than £0.6M funding from the DARP programme and links with QinetiQ and Augusta-Westland.  

 

Construction Processes

Major research grants and industry collaborations include:

 ●Three EPSRC grants in excess of £850k: two in the field of construction processes in geotechnical engineering and one in structural integrity monitoring in collaboration with the I&S Cluster.

 ●EU funding of approximately £300k for the development of monitoring devices for waste water contamination and an investigation of unbraced composite columns in fire.

 ● Computational research on the interaction between structures and steep or breaking waves funded (£216k) by EPSRC, Leverhulme Trust and Royal Society.

 ●The continued development of strong links with industry attract significant industry support for research on piled foundations (Stent Foundations), earthquake resistant non-engineering buildings (Pell-Frischmann Group), reinforced concrete mooring dolphins subject to ship impact and pushed in sheet piles (Global Maritime).

  ● Donations from industry support research in geotechnical and structural engineering (£82k).

 


Instrumentation and Sensors 

The Cluster has been supported extensively through external funding from diverse sources including: two major EU grants (€600k) underpinned by Fiat and Snecma respectively; a number of EPSRC grants including a £0.5M Platform Grant (jointly with AIAT Cluster), a £0.5M Challenging Engineering grant with Queen’s University Belfast, two Faraday grants (>£0.5M, one rated ‘outstanding’) and collaboration in a new £2M DIUS Technology Transfer grant on instrumentation for light concrete structures. The Biomedical area has attracted major equipment support from the SAAD group as well as a £1.5M laboratory refurbishment grant from the Wellcome Trust jointly with the School of Health Sciences; additional support from two EPSRC Interact grants with China and India (rated ‘outstanding’);a UKIERI major grant (>£420k- one of only 6 awarded in photonics research) and an EPSRC Interact: India grant announced in October 2007 (£160k) for digital monitoring.  Key to success has been people-focused grants illustrated by two EU-funded Marie Curie Fellows and a new EPSRC international networking grant (£200k).    

 

Systems and Control 

The funding of the Cluster reflects the drive for migrating advanced Systems and Control methodologies to industry and involves: 

 ● Systems Integration and Control: Three EU grants (£950K) support: Redesign of Operations/Business of Chemical Processes; simulation, Business performance and evaluation/re-engineering of chemical supply chains. The Royal Academy of Engineering funds a Chair for Systems Integration (Stupples) and EPSRC (share of £600k) supports machine vision research on neonate lung function monitoring.

 ● Reliability: supported by DTI/DARP (Rolls-Royce aero engines Design for Reliability; Ultra-Reliable Aircraft, part of URAM; total £250k) and the EPSRC 2001-2006 DIRC project (Share of £1.25M with Centre for Software Reliability). 

● Energy, Environment and Risk: Three projects from BNFL/MoD on diagnostics and safety in nuclear/MOD projects (£234k); participation in SPRIng, Research Councils’ project on Sustainable Nuclear Power (part in £2.05M). Power Engineering and Railway Signalling (EDF Energy, £150k); EPSRC NOE on IT Forensics and Data (£125k)

 

3.2 List of Esteem Factors per submitted member

 

The expectation is that all members of the School submitted to this UOA are acting as reviewers for Scientific Journals, evaluators of research proposals, external examiners for research degrees, IPC members and Session Chairmen for International Conferences and Keynote speakers. Personal esteem is presented for those whose profile is above the expected baseline. In addition, the leaders of all Clusters are Editors of International Journals in their respective area. Additional areas of personal esteem are presented for a number of staff below:

 

Professor C.  Arcoumanis 

Fellow: Royal Academy of Engineering; International Society of Automotive Engineers; IMechE 

Editor in Chief: International Journal of Engine Research 

Chairman of International Biannual Conferences: ‘Present and Future Engines for Automobiles’ held for automotive executives; Optical and Laser Diagnostics held at City University. 

Honorary Professor St Petersburg State Polytechnical University. Member of the EPSRC College since its establishment.  Awarded over £1.6M in grants/contracts as PI over the period.  

 

Professor J. Atkinson 

Fellow: Institution of Civil Engineers and Geological Society.

Editor: Geotechnique. Editorial Board: Soils and Foundations; Italian Geotechnical Journal.

 

Professor R. Banerjee 

Fellow: Royal Aeronautical Society. Associate Fellow: American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics.

Member of EPSRC College since its establishment.

 

Professor L. Boswell 

Editorship: Special “Jack-Up” issues, IntJ for Marine Structures, 2001,2003,2005. 

Chairman of International Conference on The Jack-Up Platform. 

Visiting Professor at: Asian Institute of Technology, Bangkok. Member of Australian Research Council College. 

 

Dr C. W. Cheung 

Fellow: Royal Aeronautical Society

 

Professor M. Farquharson    

Council Member of International Radiation Physics Society;

Member of EPSRC College. 

 

Dr M. Gavaises 

Awarded SAE Best Paper (2006).  £0.8M in grants/contracts as PI over the period. 

 

Professor K.T.V.  Grattan 

Fellow: IET; Institute of Physics; Inst MC and Past President of Inst MC.

Editor-in-Chief: Measurement. Editorial Boards: Sensors & Actuators; Optics & Laser Technology.

Co-chair ICOLAD Conferences 2002, 2005 and 2007

Member of: EPSRC College since its creation; DTI Measurement Advisory Committee. Chairman: Optical Radiation and Photonics Working Parties (DTI) and DIUS Metrology Innovation Committee.  Awarded £1.5M grants/contracts as PI over the period. 

 

Dr G. Halikias 

Associate Editor: International Journal on Automatic Control and Systems Engineering.

Secretary, IMA Control Theory group. 

 

Professor N. Karcanias

FIMA, FIET; SMIEEE. 

Editor: IMA Journal of Mathematical Control and Information. Editorial Board: IntJC;  Bulletin of GreMath Soc. Guest editor: Kybernetica; Measurement & Control. Associate Editor for IEEE Conferences (CDC and ACC). 

Member of: EPSRC College since its creation; IFAC Linear Systems and Large Scale Systems Committees; European Control Council.  Chairman: IMA Control Theory Group. Awarded £950k grants as PI over the period.

 

Professor S.H. Khan 

FInstMC, FIET. 

Associate Editor: Measurement; Editorial Board: Measurement and Control Journal

Member: Council of InstMC;Vice-President (membership), InstMC; IMEKO Technical Committee TC7.

 

Dr A. Kovacevic (early career researcher)

Awards for best papers: Geothermal Resources Council, 2001, 2004 USA; 2001 Thomas Stephen Prize, IMechE; 2002 ASME Advanced Energy Systems; 2003 Moss Prize IMechE; 2004 GROEN Prize, IMechE.

 

Dr P. Kyriacou

FIET

Editorial Board: Measurement and Control Journal; Guest Editor. SMIEEE.

Chair: Physiological Measurement Group, InstPhy and Engineering in Medicine. Honorary Senior Fellow, Great Ormond Street Hospital and St Bartholomew's Hospital. 

 

Professor L.L. Lai

Elected FIEEE 

Editorial Board: IntJ Electrical Power & Energy Systems; IEE Proceedings Power; European Transactions on Electrical Power

Vice Chairman: IEEE Conference on Machine Learning and Cybernetics, 2005; Chair, IEE Conference on Energy and Risk Management, 2005.

IEEE Power Awards: 2003 Outstanding Large Chapter Award; Paper Award, 2003 Power Generation Committee.

 

Dr P. Liatsis

Editorial Boards: IntJ on Automatic Control and Systems Engineering;IntJ of Signal and Imaging Systems. Guest Editor: IntJ of Pattern Recognition and Artificial Intelligence, 2006.

Program Chair, 2002 IEEE/EURASIP.  Member of EPSRC College since 2001. 

 

Dr Q. Ma

Editorial Board: Computer Modelling in Engineering & Sciences

EPSRCCollegemember. Guest Professor of Jiangsu University. 

 

Dr A.M. McNamara (early career researcher)

Co-opted member of the British Geotechnical Association Executive. 

Paper awards: Henry Adams Prize Institute of Structural Engineers, 2005; Telford Prize of Institute of Civil Engineers. 

 

Professor M.J. Newby

Fellow: IMA, Royal Statistical Society, Safety and Reliability Society. 

Associate Editor: Asia-Pacific Journal of OR. Editorial Boards: Proceedings of the IMechE Part O: Risk and Reliability; Quality and Reliability Engineering.

Steering Committee of EURANDOM SIM project (http://www.eurandom.tue.nl/). Member of the Dutch Beta Research School (http://fp.tm.tue.nl/beta/). Visiting Professor TU Eindhoven. EPSRC College member. Awarded 400k grants as PI over the period.

 

Dr R. Price 

Secretary to EURADOS specialist group WG6 – Computational Dosimetry and Standards. 

 

Professor B.M.A. Rahman

SMIEEE. 

Editorial Boards: Int Journal of Microwave; Optical Technology.

Executive Committee, IEEE UKRI chapter.

 

Dr S.E. Stallebrass 

Editorial Board: Proceedings of Institute of Civil Engineers, Geotechnical Engineering. 

Member of EPSRC College since its establishment. British Geotechnical Association: Executive Committee, 2004-2007; Vice Chairman (2007–2009); Chairman-elect (2009–2011).

 

Professor N. Stosic 

FIMechE

Awards for best papers: Geothermal Resources Council, 2001, 2004 USA; 2001 Thomas Stephen Prize, IMechE; 2002 ASME Advanced Energy Systems; 2003 Moss Prize IMechE; 2004 GROEN Prize, ImechE.

 

Professor D.W. Stupples

FInstMC. Royal Academy Engineering Chair on Systems Integration

Chairman Systems and Management (Inst MC). 

RoAEng: Integrated Systems Design and member of the Academy Risk Project. Member of: MOD (Defence Procurement Agency (DPA); Integration Authority (IA)); Defence Scientific Advisory Committee (DSAC); Defence Integration Authority Advisory Board; GCHQ Advisory Board. 

      

Dr. T. Sun 

EPSRC College member. Awarded £800k grants as PI over the period.

 

Professor R.N. Taylor 

Secretary General: International Society for Soil Mechanics and Geotechnical Engineering, 1999–date.

Regional Co-editor: IntJ of Physical Modelling in Geotechnics

Paper awards: Henry Adams Prize Institution of Structural Engineers, 2005; Best Paper International Journal on Physical Modelling in Geotechnics, 2001. Awarded £560k grants as PI over the period.

 

Professor P. Thomas 

FInstMC, FIET. President of InstMC, 2001 and Deputy Honorary Secretary, 2005. 

Editorial Board: Transactions InstMC, 2000 – 2002; Process Safety, Trans IChemE B 2006- .

Academic Board: Royal Navy's Department of Nuclear Technology; BNFL/Manchester Dalton Project. Executive Board of UK Automatic Control Council, 2001 –

Honeywell International Medal 2004 by InstMC. 

 

Professor K. Virdi 

FInst. Civil Engineers and FInst. Structural Engineers. 

Vice Chairman: Institute of Structural Engineers. 

Foreign Member, Royal Society for Arts and Science, Göteborg/Sweden.